Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Walk to the Rinconada


We took another two-mile walk this morning, to the back of the valley near our casa.





Ecuador is a major exporter of roses. In our area there are numerous rose plantations. Here's a departing one of them, loaded up for the market.


The local road was muddy, but we found a dry path for about a mile before we had to turn around. The weather was threatening and the road ahead of us would have required boots.

On our way back we met a woman walking with her five cows. I asked if I could take one picture of her (puedo tomar una photo, por favor?) [for those of you who speak Spanish, don't tell me if I said something really awful or totally incomprehensible] and she said yes, for a dollar!


I'm going to keep working on my Rosetta Stone Spanish course. It's five parts, with four sections in each part. I only got to part 2, section 2 before we came to Ecuador, and it has been marginally adequate for buying things we need and getting around. But there's a woman named Aida - she's the wife of the driver who brought us to San Pablo from Quito - and she's been friendly. I would like to speak Spanish well enough to communicate with her. She'd make a good friend, I think, if we come back here again. We saw Aida yesterday, and she gave us a flower for Valentine's Day. We set it in the sun and it blossomed for us.


11 comments:

Blissed-Out Grandma said...

It's great that you're willing to use what Spanish you do know. I can see you learning more every year, and talking up a storm.

Retired English Teacher said...

Spanish and I have never gotten on well. My students used to laugh when I tried to use it. I really tried to use some Spanish when I was in Mexico the last time, but again, I relied on my Spanish speaking friends. I admire you for trying.

DJan said...

I was lucky about Spanish: when I was three, we moved to Puerto Rico and all my playmates spoke Spanish. By the time we left, I was six and fluent. However, I didn't use it any more, but my "ear" is excellent for Spanish since I once, long ago, knew how to say it right. Now, however, I hear the words and see them in my mind but they don't connect with meaning until long after the moment has passed.

I love the language and have occasionally taken it up again. It's gone at the moment, but what you said worked just fine! :-)

Muffy's Marks said...

What a lovely gift. Good luck learning Spanish. You are motivated and should do well.

Out on the prairie said...

The rose plantations sound real interesting and fragrant.

Linda Reeder said...

I took Spanish in high school, and for one quarter in college, but I was never very good at it.
In your situation, though, it is a good opportunity to learn it and use it. It sounds like you might be returning.

Olga said...

From what I think I know of you I am certain you will be speaking fluent Spanish on your next trip. What a true gift to the soul it is to immerse yourself in your travel.

Arkansas Patti said...

It is great you are trying to learn the language instead of demanding they understand English as too many tourists do.
I'll bet those farms smell delightful.

Ms Sparrow said...

Spanish is such a valuable language to have in this changing world. My great-granddaughters even get some advanced education watching "Dora the Explorer"! Even it they don't retain a lot of vocabulary, they still develop an ear for it. Even as a clinic volunteer it comes in handy. Recently a woman with a child in tow came up to me at the lobby desk and urgently asked, "Banyos?". I don't know how I picked up that word, but I was able to quickly guide her to the restrooms. I wish I'd taken Spanish in high school instead of Latin.

Galen Pearl said...

Good for you for jumping in there with your Spanish. Hope you don't do what I did and ask for soup instead of soap! Having a daughter these past few years who has English as a second language has given me a whole new appreciation for the different meanings resulting from slight alterations in the words.

#1Nana said...

You'll be surprised by how quickly your Spanish will improve during the time you are there. By week two I'm usually a lot more confident. I was subbing in Spanish earlier this week and realized how rusty I have become. I am envious of your adventures. Maybe i can find an opportunity to speak Spanish in Texas next month?